Criminal Law - list of new articles

By Nolo (www.nolo.com) [May 20th, 2019]
Most people know that our inherited characteristics come from chromosomes and genes. Since the 1950s, science has also known that the chromosomes consist of self-replicating molecules known as deoxyribonucleic acid, or DNA, and that our genes consist of subsets of these very-large molecules. Now, as the end of the century rapidly approaches, we are on the verge of learning which genes result in which characteristics. While this knowledge promises untold rewards in the treatment of disease, agricultural production and an understanding of life itself, it is also being used as a means to uniquely identify individuals and to link individuals to criminal activities. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
Attorney's fees (note that the use of the word 'attorney' connotes lawyers broadly: solicitors and barristers) are the costs of legal representation that an attorney's client or a party to a lawsuit incurs. Attorney's fees are assessed in a number of ways, usually set by contract in advance of the representation, including by billable hours, flat fees, or contingent fees. Attorneys who voluntarily accept work on behalf of indigent clients often work pro bono. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
If the charge is a minor traffic offense, the law requires the officer to just ticket you (that is, give you a citation which orders you to appear in court later), rather than arrest you. However, if you refuse to sign the citation, or refuse to identify yourself, or if it appears to the officer that you are in need of medical attention, then he can arrest you on this minor traffic offense. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
You have the right to be told why you are being arrested, and the nature of the charges against you (the crime for which you are being arrested). If you are arrested on a warrant, you have the right to see the warrant, you have the right to see the warrant within a reasonable time after your arrest, to read it and make certain your name appears on it, and to see the charge against you. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
When a crime is committed in a police officer's presence - or he has probable cause to believe that certain misdemeanors or any felony was committed that he did not see happen - an officer may arrest a suspect on the spot without an arrest warrant. The officer will later submit a charging/warrant request to the Prosecuting Attorney, suggesting potential charges to be authorized. Most cases begin with a warrant request. This is generally the first time that the Prosecuting Attorney is involved in a case, unless he reviewed a search warrant or visited the crime scene. At this stage, the Prosecutor determines whether a person should be charged with a crime and, if so, what the crime should be. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
The decision is one of weighing the likelihood of a high blood-alchohol or drug reading against the consequences for refusing. The outcomes of refusing to submit to a blood, breath or urine test depend on the state. Generally, but not always, there are consequences... .... >> MORE


By Pay No Fines (www.paynofines.com) [October 3rd, 2016]
Unless you get a contempt of court charge for some outrageous behavior, your fine will be exactly what you would have mailed in originally. You will only be out your time invested. Remember, it's not just the fine but also the increased insurance premiums you're trying to save with your time investment. It is important to remember that traffic laws and codes differ from state to state and are constantly changing. You must do your homework to insure that you are current in all matters relevant to your particular situation. In addition, the information in this Guide is intended as basic strategies and tactics. Consider this Guide as your game plan, but you still need to get in there and pitch. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
When someone is paroled, they serve part of their sentence under the supervision of their community. The law says that the U.S. Parole Commission may grant parole if (a) the inmate has substantially observed the rules of the institution; (b) release would not depreciate the seriousness of the offense or promote disrespect for the law; and (c) release would not jeopardize the public welfare. A criminal offender becomes eligible for parole according to the type of sentence received from the court. The "parole eligibility date" is the earliest time the offender might be paroled. If the Parole Commission decides to grant parole, it will set the date of release, but the date must be on or after the "eligibility" date. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
Certain offenses can be charged as either ordinance or criminal offenses - for example, retail theft (shoplifting) or disorderly conduct. And some offenses are noncriminal for first time offenders but criminal for second time violators. The most common example of this is operating a motor vehicle while under the influence of intoxicants. A monetary penalty for a crime is called a fine. For a noncriminal offense, it's called a civil forfeiture. .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
Preparation is one of the main things you need to pay special attention to when applying for a lawsuit. Depositions are the key to successful trial preparation. You can win a case by eliciting a good answer. You can lose a case through a slip of you client's tongue. Depositions are mostly taken in civil (money damage) cases. In criminal cases, depositions of defendants and people who may become defendants are less likely to occur. In civil cases, the opposition has the right to obtain damaging information from defendants. In criminal cases, the defendant has a right to refuse to incriminate himself (or herself). .... >> MORE


By Frederick Dirkson [October 3rd, 2016]
Invoke your right to remain silent. You are not required to give a statement to the police so don't. You have the right to an attorney so SPEAK WITH AN ATTORNEY. If you are accused of any crime remain silent and seek legal advice immediately. Give your name and address and let the police know you want an attorney. Do not agree to anything until your attorney tells you to do so. .... >> MORE


By West's Encyclopedia of American Law [October 3rd, 2016]
Jurisdiction By West's Encyclopedia of American Law The geographic area over which authority extends; legal .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
Habitual offender Person who frequently has been convicted of criminal behaviour and is presumed to be a danger to society. In .... >> MORE


By WORLD Law Direct, updated: [October 3rd, 2016]
Criminal fraud warning regarding the firm "Solid Investment" (SI) and its site solidinvestment.com August 27, 2008 .... >> MORE


By WORLDLawDirect [October 3rd, 2016]
Methamphetamine is a powerfully addictive stimulant that dramatically affects the central nervous system. The drug is made easily in clandestine laboratories .... >> MORE